Tag Archive | Reunion68 Reunion 68 Reunion’68 Reunion-68

Why Israel can say ‘no’ to American diktats

Why Israel can say ‘no’ to American diktats

JONATHAN S. TOBIN


There’s no alternative to the alliance with the United States. But support from ordinary Americans and the GOP means it doesn’t have to sacrifice its security to please Biden.
.

The relationship between Israel and the United States has frayed since the start of war against the Hamas terrorist organization in the Gaza Strip. Credit: FOTOGRIN/Shutterstock.
.

The Biden administration wants us to believe two contradictory things at the same time. Depending on the circumstances or the audience to which President Joe Biden and senior members of his foreign-policy team are addressing, they’re either committed to supporting Israel and in favor of eliminating Hamas. Except when they’re not.

In just the last week, Biden pledged at a Holocaust memorial ceremony that he would always stand with Israel and never forget what the Hamas terrorists had done on Oct. 7. A day later, he flipped the script.

In an interview with CNN, as he’s done repeatedly in recent months, he adopted some of Hamas’s talking points about Israel indiscriminately killing civilians. He said that if it invaded Rafah—Hamas’s last stronghold in Gaza—“I’m not supplying the weapons.” The alleged motive for this stand was to prevent Palestinian civilians from being killed, even though the United Nations has accepted that the casualty figures Washington has been citing are not credible. This would essentially mean that Hamas’s use of human shields would give it impunity for being held accountable for its crimes.

Biden flip-flops

That raised the possibility of a complete arms cutoff to an ally at war against a genocidal foe that—previous statements notwithstanding—the administration doesn’t want to see wiped out. Making good on this threat, a shipment of bombs was not sent to Israel as part of an effort to intimidate Jerusalem into backing off and letting Hamas survive. And when Republicans proposed a bill in the House of Representatives that would essentially force Biden to send the weapons to Israel that the United States had already promised, the president threatened to veto it.

But this week, in a gesture that may well have been intended to stop the bleeding of centrist support for Biden’s re-election campaign, the administration told Congress that it intends to sell more than $1 billion in new weapons to Israel. This sale won’t include the precision bombs and missiles Israel needs to take out the final strongholds of Hamas in Rafah, without which the battle there would likely be bloodier for both sides. But the tactical vehicles and ammunition in this new batch will still be of great use to the Israel Defense Forces.

Much like the U.S. assistance that Israel received when Iran launched missiles against it last month, Biden would appear not to want to leave the Jewish state completely defenseless but also doesn’t want to give it the ability to win wars against its foes or be able to ensure its security.

All of this raises some important questions. Is Biden merely pursuing a vision for Israel’s security that doesn’t include a decisive victory over Hamas in order to pave the way for a theoretical and entirely fantastical hope for peace in the future? Or is what we are observing a slow-motion betrayal of the Jewish state in which America undermines the alliance in stages, rather than all at once, placing it and U.S. interests in the region in grave danger? And how much of what the administration is doing is mere political virtue-signaling intended to aid the president’s faltering re-election campaign?

A toxic yet irreplaceable ally

Administration apologists and their critics can make arguments about how to characterize the situation. But no matter what the conclusion, the mere fact that these questions have to be asked makes it clear that Israel is, at best, locked into a relationship with a superpower ally that cannot be relied upon at present. Even if one is prepared to believe Biden’s protestations about caring about Israel, his political situation has compromised his administration’s willingness to be a faithful ally. Much of his party’s leftist base is ideologically opposed to the existence of the Jewish state and increasingly indifferent to antisemitism. That means the political juggling act the president is attempting to pull off is a gift that keeps giving to Hamas and its Iranian backers, as well as being deeply harmful to Israelis.

As a New York Times article published last weekend stated, the Jewish state may be defiant and prepared to—in Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s phrase—“stand alone to defeat Hamas and ensure the security of its citizens. But there’s no denying that it is isolated on the international stage.

Israel has little choice but to go into Rafah. Allowing Hamas to survive—and thereby win the war that it started with an orgy of murder, rape, torture and wanton destruction—would strike a potentially fatal blow to the country’s ability to deter attacks. Indeed, it would almost make certain that Hamas would be able to make good on its pledges to repeat its Oct. 7 crimes over and over again.

But no one, including those who believe that the Biden administration’s damaging stands should impel Israel from seeking more self-sufficiency in terms of arms production, should take the question of Israel’s isolation lightly. While it might be tempting to contemplate seeking help elsewhere, there is no substitute or alternative to the U.S. alliance.

Biden’s betrayal

While Biden was initially supportive of Israel’s efforts, the surge in anti-Zionist and antisemitic agitation on the political left since the Hamas massacres has convinced the White House that a pro-Israel policy could cost the president the votes of many in the Democratic Party come November. That encouraged a Biden foreign-policy team of Obama administration alumni that was already hostile to Israel and still eager to appease its Iranian backers to oppose an outcome in Gaza that would eliminate the terrorists. The result has been a gradual escalation in threats of an arms cutoff that would hamstring the IDF campaign. It would also make a future effort to push Hezbollah terrorists back from Israel’s northern border, which has been rendered uninhabitable by the firing of rockets and missiles from Lebanon, difficult if not impossible to carry out.

Biden’s turn against Israel is about more than just arms and ammunition, or even the pressure he’s exerting to force Netanyahu to accept a prolonged ceasefire with Hamas without even getting all the hostages (including five Americans) back. The threat that Washington won’t veto Palestinian statehood or sanctions against Israel at the United Nations also puts Jerusalem in the position of a vassal state with no control over its own fate.

This ongoing campaign has understandably made many Israelis question the future and value of an American alliance that right now seems predicated on Washington holding the Jewish state’s security prisoner.

Is there another choice?

That dilemma leads to two questions that Israel’s government has to ask itself. Can Jerusalem do anything to lessen its dependence on Washington? And is there an alternative to the alliance with the United States that would give Israel at least some of the benefits that it derives from the current arrangement?

The answers to those queries are a qualified “yes” and an emphatic “no.”

It’s true that Israel can and should increase its manufacturing capacity with respect to arms and ammunition. The last seven months of combat against Hamas have again proved that waging war is an expensive business. The prolonged conflict has strained Israel’s ammunition reserves, as well as its ability to maintain its anti-missile defenses like the Iron Dome. That has given the Biden administration the leverage to second-guess and attempt to micromanage Israel’s post-Oct. 7 offensive to eradicate Hamas.

But Israel is not currently in a position to manufacture major weapons systems like warplanes or anti-missile defenses on its own. That is mostly the result of a consistent U.S. policy of seeking to discourage or prevent Israel from doing so. This is partly motivated by a desire to protect American arms manufacturers; almost all of the assistance is spent in the United States, so it’s as much an aid program for the U.S. arms industry as it is to Israel. It’s also partly done out to keep Israel dependent on its ally. That started with the Reagan administration’s successful effort to shut down production of Israel’s Lavi fighter bomber in 1987 and has continued to the present day, in which the Obama administration’s 10-year commitment to military aid ensured that Israel couldn’t kick the habit so easily.

Friends with benefits

Still, these problems shouldn’t obscure the fact that both Israel and America have benefited enormously from their alliance.

Having the Americans behind them gives the Israelis the backing of a superpower with the world’s most powerful military, access to the most advanced weapons in the world and the diplomatic cover that comes with having a friend with veto power on the U.N. Security Council.

In return, the Americans get access to Israeli intelligence (though not necessarily always reciprocating) and the vaunted Israeli expertise in high-tech and weapons development that improves their defense systems. And no price can be put upon the benefit of having a reliable and democratic ally who shares their values in a region as strategic as the Middle East.

Many in the Biden administration seem to no longer value having Israel or even moderate Arab regimes as allies. Their foolish pursuit of a rapprochement with Iran has done nothing but weaken U.S. influence and sacrifice its interests as well as those of its partners.

Yet as unreliable and even toxic as the relationship with Washington has become, the notion that there is any viable alternative to the United States for Israel is absurd. No other nation—not even a Communist Chinese government that is trying to buy influence across the globe—could give Israel the sort of help that Washington provides. And for all of the problems that come with this relationship, for Israel to seek closer ties with Beijing or Moscow would be to engage in deals with undemocratic and hostile nations that would be far more unreliable and eager to exert undue influence than the Americans. Getting closer to China—America’s chief geostrategic foe in the 21st century—would also raise the danger of alienating Republicans and Democrats alike in the United States.

Israel isn’t alone

That said, Netanyahu need not bend the knee to Biden or obey all of his diktats. He or anyone who replaced him will always want to stay close to the Americans but not at the cost of Israel’s security. As Netanyahu demonstrated when he repeatedly defied former President Barack Obama on issues like Israel’s borders and Jerusalem, Israel can say “no” if it has to.

The reason is that even when relations are at a low ebb, as they are now with Biden, and contrary to that New York Times headline, Israel isn’t really alone or completely isolated. It retains the support of the majority of the American people. And since Biden’s Republican opponents are overwhelmingly pro-Israel, a betrayal of the Jewish state will—left-wing rage about Gaza notwithstanding—cost Biden dearly at the ballot box when he faces former President Donald Trump, who can boast of being the most pro-Israel president in history.

A bipartisan consensus in favor of Israel would be better than the current situation in which the Democrats are deeply divided about the issue. But as long as one of the two major parties remains devoted to preserving the alliance (and most Americans still identify with Israel and rightly regard the Palestinian cause as one inextricably tied to Islamist terror), then there is no need for Israel to desperately seek another ally. Instead, it and its American friends must fight to repair and preserve the relationship. And as Biden’s most recent gesture towards Israel showed, he knows that a complete betrayal may come at a price he doesn’t wish to pay.


JONATHAN S. TOBIN
Jonathan S. Tobin is editor-in-chief of JNS (Jewish News Syndicate). Follow him @jonathans_tobin.

Zawartość publikowanych artykułów i materiałów nie reprezentuje poglądów ani opinii Reunion’68,
ani też webmastera Blogu Reunion’68, chyba ze jest to wyraźnie zaznaczone.
Twoje uwagi, linki, własne artykuły lub wiadomości prześlij na adres:
webmaster@reunion68.com


Is It Possible to Destroy Hamas? Experts Weigh in as US Rhetoric Shifts

Is It Possible to Destroy Hamas? Experts Weigh in as US Rhetoric Shifts

Jack Elbaum


Israeli soldiers inspect the entrance to what they say is a tunnel used by Hamas terrorists during a ground operation in a location given as Gaza, in this handout image released Nov. 9, 2023. Photo: Israel Defense Forces/Handout via REUTERS

Amid a shift in rhetoric among US officials regarding Israel’s ability to destroy Hamas, there has been growing uncertainty about whether that war aim is feasible.

According to experts who spoke with The Algemeiner, Israel can remove the Palestinian terrorist group from power in Gaza, although efforts by the Biden administration and the international community more broadly to halt Israeli military operations have hurt that effort. However, the experts argued, fully eradicating Hamas from the coastal enclave will be nearly impossible at this point.

Recent comments from top officials in the US State Department have suggested the Biden administration has an evolving view of Israel’s ability to destroy Hamas, which rules Gaza.

On Monday, US Deputy Secretary of State Kurt Campbell said it does not seem likely Israel will be able to achieve “total victory” — in the parlance of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu — over Hamas.

“In some respects, we are struggling over what the theory of victory is,” he said. “I don’t think we believe that [total victory] is likely or possible and that this looks a lot like situations that we found ourselves in after 9/11, where, after civilian populations had been moved and lots of violence … the insurrections continue.”

Meanwhile, Secretary of State Antony Blinken expressed similar sentiments on Sunday.

“We’re seeing parts of Gaza that Israel has cleared of Hamas, where Hamas is coming back, including in the north, including in Khan Younis,” he said, suggesting Israel’s strategy may not be working. “A lot of armed Hamas will be left no matter what they do in Rafah.”

The Algemeiner asked the State Department to clarify its stance on whether it believes Hamas can be destroyed and whether it is willing to accept the terrorist group staying in power in some capacity.

“The president has made clear the United States wants to see Hamas defeated and justice delivered to [Yahya] Sinwar,” a spokesperson said, referring to the terrorist group’s leader in Gaza. “There can be no equivocation on that.”

But, at the same time, the spokesperson argued, “the only way to completely defeat an idea is to offer a better one. Military pressure is necessary but not sufficient to fully defeat Hamas. If Israel’s military effort is not accompanied by a political plan for the future of Gaza and the Palestinian people, the terrorists will keep coming back and Israel will remain under threat.”

The State Department official added that “we are seeing this happen in Gaza City,” referring to the fact that Hamas terrorists have returned to some areas in Gaza where they had been driven out by Israeli forces.

Israel has not publicly articulated a clear plan for the “day after” Hamas is defeated in Gaza, leading critics to claim that Israel’s operations may ultimately prove fruitless if the terrorists are able to re-occupy areas of Gaza where Israeli forces have left.

Max Abrahms, a tenured professor of international relations at Northeastern University and a consultant to US government agencies, disagreed with the notion that Israel has lacked any kind of a strategy, suggesting those pushing such a claim may have an agenda. “This constant refrain about Netanyahu not having a plan for the day after has been weaponized in order to justify pressuring Israel into halting its military operations in Gaza,” he told The Algemeiner.

Abrahms also argued it is unlikely Israel will be able to fully defeat Hamas at this point. 

On one hand, “we’ve seen throughout history many examples of terrorists getting absolutely crushed and never recovering. One example of counter-terrorism working, which is very salient, was ISIS based in Syria,” he said.

“However,” Abrahms explained, “I do not believe that Hamas will be eradicated, even as a terrorist group, out of Gaza.” Some of the blame, he argued, lies on “the international community, including the Biden White House, which has continuously restrained the IDF [Israel Defense Forces] from effectively going after Hamas.”

“The enormous delay before Rafah, as well as the pressure on Israel to draw down its troops out of Gaza, enabled Hamas not only to survive in Rafah, but to reposition itself in northern Gaza,” Abrahms added. “So, it is impossible to imagine, at this point, that Hamas will be eradicated from Gaza, but it didn’t need to be that way.”

Danielle Pletka, a senior fellow in foreign and defense policy studies at the American Enterprise Institute (AEI), told The Algemeiner that she believes Israel can still achieve its war aims. “Removing a group from power,” she argued, “is a much simpler goal than eradicating it, which is actually, certainly in its most absolute sense, unachievable.”

Asked about those who are questioning the prudence of Israel’s military strategy and whether it is conducive to achieving its war aims, she said, “I don’t question Israel’s strategy here. I think, you know, they’ve got a good 76 years of experience in dealing with the enemy.”

“The idea that we should be sitting here in Washington, DC, and suggesting that the Israelis are fools,” she said, is incorrect and counterproductive.


Zawartość publikowanych artykułów i materiałów nie reprezentuje poglądów ani opinii Reunion’68,
ani też webmastera Blogu Reunion’68, chyba ze jest to wyraźnie zaznaczone.
Twoje uwagi, linki, własne artykuły lub wiadomości prześlij na adres:
webmaster@reunion68.com


Kobiety, Hamas i luksusowe wierzenia

Źródło: zrzut z ekranu wideo: UCLA protest: groups address overnight violence at pro-Palestinian encampment (youtube.com)


Kobiety, Hamas i luksusowe wierzenia

Andrzej Koraszewski


Rewolucja jest kobietą, najpierw pisze pełne współczucia listy do skazanych za masowe morderstwa, a potem proponuje im małżeństwo. Heather Mac Donald, redaktor naczelna amerykańskiego magazynu „City Journal”, zastanawia się nad pytaniem, dlaczego wśród protestujących na uniwersytetach dominują kobiety? Autorka nie dysponuje dokładnymi danymi statystycznymi, ale osobista obserwacja, materiały zdjęciowe i filmy nie pozostawiają wiele miejsca na wątpliwości, amerykańskie studentki kochają Hamas i sprawiedliwość.

Przyczyn jest wiele. Po pierwsze, struktura demograficzna studiujących na uniwersytetach radykalnie się zmieniła i obecnie kobiety mają przewagę. Po drugie, ta przewaga jest zdecydowanie większa na kierunkach humanistycznych. Po trzecie kobiety niemal całkowicie zdominowały różne organizacje studenckie, gdzie króluje religia intersekcjonalności.

„Osoby zajmujące się naukami ścisłymi i ekonomią rzadziej spędzają dni lub całe tygodnie  na imprezach (korekta: pod hasłem „przeciwstawiajcie się ludobójstwu”) […] W naukach humanistycznych i miękkich naukach społecznych, dziedzinach, w których można nawet zyskać dodatkowe punkty za swój intersekcjonalny aktywizm, przeważają kobiety. Ale co najważniejsze, ideologia ofiary, która opanowała dziś większość środowiska akademickiego, z jej wyraźną wrogością wobec obiektywizmu i rozumu jako konstruktów białych mężczyzn, ma charakter kobiecy.”

Autorka zaczyna od opisu wykrzykiwanych kobiecymi głosami haseł wzywających do ludobójstwa, przechodząc potem do dyskursu wokół „kryzysu zdrowia psychicznego” opowieści o traumach i trudnościach skupienia się z powodu różnych mikroagresji. („Nie tak dawno temu administratorzy zaczęli wprowadzać psy terapeutyczne do bibliotek i jadalni na kampusie, aby pomóc studentom radzić sobie z problemami psychicznymi”.)

Te protesty to ewidentny jarmarczny teatr, a teatr wymaga zawieszenia niewiary. Jak pisze Heather Mac Donald, „narcystyczny melodramat rozgrywający się na dziedzińcach uniwersytetów wymaga aktywnego zaangażowania w nieprawdę”.

Niedawno na rynku księgarskim ukazała się książka absolwenta Yale i doktora psychologii z Cambridge, który miał również praktykę w Stanford University, a więc z doświadczeniem z trzech amerykańskich uniwersytetów z ligi bluszczowej. Dotarł do Yale po ośmiu latach służby w armii, do której zaciągnął się jako siedemnastolatek, uciekając od alkoholu, narkotyków i perspektywy więzienia. Po koszmarnym dzieciństwie i wielokrotnym przekazywaniu od jednej rodziny zastępczej do drugiej, po dorastaniu bez nadzoru dorosłych, w świecie biedy i niepewności, armia dawała rygor dyscypliny, który skończył się epizodem alkoholizmu. Kiedy po zakończeniu kuracji odwykowej zdecydował się na studia, armia opłaciła jego czesne i Rob Henderson znalazł się w świecie, który znał tylko z ekranu telewizora. Był nie tylko starszy od kolegów z roku, był dziwadłem wśród młodych ludzi z bardzo zamożnych domów, przekonanych o swojej moralnej wyższości i przeznaczeniu, że będą przywódcami świata, których symbolem statusu była zabawa w awangardę proletariatu.

Henderson nazywa te poglądy „luksusowymi wierzeniami”: używają słów, których zwykły człowiek nie rozumie, walczą z tradycyjną rodziną, chociaż większość z nich wyrosła w pełnych rodzinach, promują wolny seks, ale w końcu zakładają rodziny, a świat rozbitych rodzin to klasy niższe. Zmierzają do karier w korporacjach i instytucjach państwowych, ale symbolem statusu jest walka z kapitalizmem, udają współczucie dla biednych, ale robią co w ich mocy, żeby biedni pozostali biednymi.

Czy ma rację akcentując tak silnie rolę tradycyjnej rodziny? Z jego perspektywy trudno o wątpliwości, dostarczenie możliwości edukacyjnych nie zdaje się na nic, jeśli dziecko nie ma motywacji. Wyrastał w świecie, w którym ambicje były w szkole wyśmiewane, odrzucał zachęty ze strony nauczycieli, bo dorośli nie zasługiwali na zaufanie.

Kiedy nagle znalazł się wśród ludzi z klasy społecznej, która zbudowała ten nowy wspaniały świat, próbował zrozumieć, jak działają umysły tych, którzy domagają się zmniejszenia wydatków na policję, odmawiając zobaczenia, do czego ich żądania doprowadziły. Pokazuje statystyki wzrostu przestępstw, ucieczkę ludzi z policji i trudności z rekrutacją do sił policyjnych. Bełkotliwa „postępowość” zarówno studentów, jak i wielu profesorów jest nie tylko demonstracją społecznego statusu, staje się wyznaniem wiary blokującej rozsądek.

Nic dziwnego, że jego książka przyjęta została z, delikatnie mówiąc, mieszanymi uczuciami. Ten obraz przyszłych elit, legitymujących się dyplomami uczelni z najwyższą renomą, budzi poważny niepokój wyższych sfer. Te luksusowe wierzenia klasy uprzywilejowanej, która bawi się w dyskurs o „białym przywileju”, która odrzuca fundamenty kultury, bo tak nakazuje ich moda, która tłumi dyskusje w imię źle pojętej wolności słowa i odrzuca konstytucyjny ład w imię udawanego współczucia, to nie tylko zabawy niedojrzałych ludzi, którym przedłużono dzieciństwo w nieskończoność, ale ideologia klasy społecznej, która znajduje pełne poparcie władz i mediów.

Henderson zdaje sobie sprawę z tego, że zjawisko pogoni za statusem nie jest nowe, przywołuje Klasę próżniaczą Thorsteina Veblena oraz innych autorów pokazujących, jak bardzo pogoń za statusem kłóci się z rozumem i uczciwością. 

Autor nie zwraca uwagi na szczególną rolę kobiet w promowaniu tych „luksusowych wierzeń”, dostrzegają to inni, a szczególnie staroświeckie feministki, patrzące z rozpaczą i odrazą na tabuny rozwrzeszczanych młodych kobiet deklarujących solidarność z najbardziej wstecznym, ludobójczym patriarchatem.        

Czy jest to hybrystofilia, dobrze znane w psychologii zjawisko seksualnego zainteresowania osobami, które popełniły gwałtowne przestępstwo? Seryjni mordercy otrzymują od kobiet dziesiątki listów pełnych współczucia i zainteresowania, włącznie z ofertami matrymonialnymi.

Rewolucyjny romantyzm porywał kobiety również we wcześniejszych epokach, ale wtedy powszechny patriarchalizm uniemożliwiał im odegranie dominującej roli.

Dziś połączenie poczucia własnej wyższości, z martyrologią, traumą przesytu i równością płci, (którą im wywalczyły te staroświeckie feministki), przynosi ciekawy efekt w postaci dominacji damskich głosów skandujących ludobójcze hasła w imię osobliwie pojmowanej sprawiedliwości. Pytane, czy wiedzą coś o ideologii Hamasu, Hezbollahu, Islamskiej Republiki Iranu, oskarżają  o bezwarunkowe poparcie Izraela. Pytane, czy coś wiedzą o wychowaniu przez Hamasjugend, przerywają rozmowę. Tak więc nie udaje się tych pań zapytać, czy chciałyby, żeby ich dziecko miało takie ćwiczenia na letnich koloniach.


Zawartość publikowanych artykułów i materiałów nie reprezentuje poglądów ani opinii Reunion’68,
ani też webmastera Blogu Reunion’68, chyba ze jest to wyraźnie zaznaczone.
Twoje uwagi, linki, własne artykuły lub wiadomości prześlij na adres:
webmaster@reunion68.com


Prasa o konkursie Eurowizji: niegodny spektakl

Eden Golan podczas występu na Eurowizji


Prasa o konkursie Eurowizji: niegodny spektakl

Wojciech Szymański


Gazeta „Allgemeine Zeitung” z Moguncji komentuje: „Konkurs Eurowizji, jakiego doświadczyliśmy w tych chaotycznych dniach w Malmö, nie był spokojnym i radosnym festiwalem muzycznym, jakim chciałby być. Światowa polityka przyćmiła to wydarzenie. Trudno było wyczuć hasło ‘Zjednoczni przez muzykę’. Zamiast tego niektórzy uczestnicy i prezenterzy punktów brali udział w podżeganiu i nienawiści. (…) Niegodny spektakl, który powinien być zdecydowanie potępiony. (…) Eurowizja chce utrzymać dystans do polityki? Nie udało się. I już się nie uda”.

Dziennik „Frankfurter Rundschau” ocenia: „Triumf niebinarnego Nemo może być postrzegany jako dowód głębokiej, fundamentalnej tolerancji szerokiej europejskiej większości wobec queerowych stylów życia. Wyrzucenie z konkursu Holendra Joosta Kleina, za niewłaściwe zachowanie wobec kamerzystki, pokazuje też, że próg tolerancji dla toksycznej męskości spadł. I dobrze. Ale w centrum tych dni chaosu w Malmö była jeszcze jedna kwestia. To niewiarygodne, że żydowska piosenkarka, taka jak Eden Golan, musi słuchać gwizdów na arenie Eurowizji tylko dlatego, że jest z Izraela. To nie do pomyślenia, że tłum, w tym aktywistka klimatyczna Greta Thunberg, gloryfikują terrorystów i pokazują swoją historyczną niewiedzę. To niepojęte, że koledzy z Eurowizji unikali Eden Golan za kulisami, mobbowali ją i traktowali jak trędowatą tylko po to, by zadowolić własną bańkę mediów społecznościowych. Każda osoba, która wygwizdała lub teatralnie wyśmiała Eden Golan podczas konkursu Eurowizji powinna się wstydzić”.

Propalestyńskie protesty w Szwecji podczas EurowizjiZdjęcie: IDA MARIE ODGAARD/TT/AFP

„Lausitzer Rundschau” czytamy: „Polityczna cnota byłej Grand Prix już dawno jest passe. Nie wiele zostało z niegdysiejszego konkursu ulubionej piosenki. Od lat 90. coraz więcej uczestników przemycało w utworach polityczne wiadomości. Także opanowanie konkursu przez ruch queer można uznać za polityzację. W naturze międzynarodowych konkursów leży to, że są one wykorzystywane do przekazów politycznych ze względu na ogólnoświatową uwagę, jaką przyciągają, od igrzysk olimpijskich po mistrzostwa świata w piłce nożnej. W obecnym przypadku Eurowizji do krytyki działań Izraela w wojnie w Strefie Gazy. Ale widzowie również wykorzystują swoje głosy do składania oświadczeń politycznych. Nawet jeśli ostatecznie nie wygrali: w tym roku żaden inny kraj nie otrzymywał najwyższego wyniku od telewidzów częściej niż Izrael”.

W dzienniku „Schwaebische Zeitung” czytamy: „Piosenkarka Eden Golan została wygwizdana przez publiczność i zbojkotowana przez innych uczestników konkursu. Na zewnątrz, na ulicach Malmö, demonstranci świętowali Hamas. Niektórzy krzyczeli, że Żydzi powinni „wrócić do Polski”. Na scenie, która lubi przedstawiać się jako różnorodna i kosmopolityczna, jest to niepokojące zachowanie. Przypomina to antyizraelskie protesty na uniwersytetach w Niemczech i innych krajach. Tam również chodzi o bojkot, a nie o dialog. Gniew i gwizdy w Malmö były skierowane do młodej, zaledwie 20-letniej kobiety. Organizatorzy konkursu piosenki nie zapewnili Eden Golan bezpiecznego środowiska. Że nastrój poza Malmö jest inny, pokazały głosy publiczności. Izrael zajął drugie miejsce w globalnym głosowaniu widzów, a wśród niemieckich widzów był nawet na czele. To pokazuje: każdy, kto wzywa do bojkotu i maluje czarno-białe uproszczenia, nie mówi w imieniu większości”.


Zawartość publikowanych artykułów i materiałów nie reprezentuje poglądów ani opinii Reunion’68,
ani też webmastera Blogu Reunion’68, chyba ze jest to wyraźnie zaznaczone.
Twoje uwagi, linki, własne artykuły lub wiadomości prześlij na adres:
webmaster@reunion68.com


Screams Before Silence

Screams Before Silence

Screams Before Silence



.
A must-watch documentary. #ScreamsBeforeSilence sheds light on the unspeakable sexual violence committed on October 7. As heartbreaking as these stories in the documentary are, we cannot afford to look away.

 


Zawartość publikowanych artykułów i materiałów nie reprezentuje poglądów ani opinii Reunion’68,
ani też webmastera Blogu Reunion’68, chyba ze jest to wyraźnie zaznaczone.
Twoje uwagi, linki, własne artykuły lub wiadomości prześlij na adres:
webmaster@reunion68.com