In the 1920s, a Black cantor moved the world

In the 1920s, a Black cantor moved the world

PJ Grisar


Image by Courtesy of Henry Sapozni / A poster for Thomas LaRue (here styled as “La-Rue”), the “Black Cantor.”

In a November 4, 1921 article, critic Z. Karnblit of Der Morgn Zhurnal described LaRue’s stirring concert rendition of “Eli, Eli” — a Yiddish song Karnblit typically despised.

“This, however, was a new ‘Eli, Eli’ by a Black cantor which was so very heartfelt, and which drew so deeply from Jewish martyrdom, the Jewish cry, begging God why he has forsaken him, and producing from this song what even the greatest opera singers could not. Every person in the theater was transfixed by the Black cantor’s powerful poetic harmony.”

Yet while LaRue was celebrated in his time, he remains something of a cipher. Biographical details are scant, but he appears to have been born in Newark, N.J. to a non-Jewish mother.

“She lived in Newark where she found race prejudice to be very strong,” LaRue told The New York Age, a Black newspaper in 1922. “She could make friends only with Jewish women preferring the company of Jews to Christians.”

While it isn’t clear if LaRue’s mother converted, the article contends that she insisted he have a Jewish primary school education, be able to pray from a siddur and have a bar mitzvah in his 13th year. LaRue appears to have been brought up in a white Jewish milieu, and his notices, mooning over his voice and its fidelity of sound, bear the proof of it.

“He lived in a Jewish soundscape,” Sapoznik said.

LaRue wasn’t the only Black cantor of his day, but he is nonetheless anomalous — not only was his voice immortalized on a 78 rpm record, he came from a wholly different tradition than his contemporaries.

As Sapoznik details in his first blog post, the early 20th Century and the Great Migration gave rise to a number of Black synagogues in Harlem, then also a heavily Jewish enclave.

Many of these shuls had a recognizable Jewish liturgy, with services in Hebrew, but the proceedings were also imbued with the Black experience. Many congregations derived Judaism from their Jewish neighbors — whose Zionist ideals might have appealed to early notions of Black nationalism. Others, founded by West Indians, may have been formed by descendants of enslaved people whose slaveholders were Jews. Whatever their origins or customs, a cantorial culture emerged.

Image by Courtesy of Henry Sapozni / A cantor named Mendel, fluent in both Hebrew and Yiddish, and specializing in Yiddish songs and cantorial prayers.

One of the cantors was a Barbados-born man named Mendel, who performed in the Yiddish theater and specialized in Yiddish songs and cantorial prayers. Yet another — and certainly the most fascinating — was an Ethiopian calligrapher named Dovid Ha’Cohen who claimed to have known 29 languages, been educated in Paris and Palestine and apprenticed with a Russian cantor. According to a Variety article from the time, Ha’Cohen made the vaudeville circuit in 1921 and, from what we can tell, he ended his career leading the congregation of the Universal Ancient Ethiopian Spiritual Church of Christ in Hebrew prayer.

But LaRue doesn’t appear to have been affiliated with Black synagogues. In fact, he may not have been part of any congregation at all after childhood.

“He invented himself it seems by not having a synagogue, by only existing in the popular world,” said Sapoznik, noting that, as a Black man, he’d never have a chance at the pulpit in a White temple. “He existed on the periphery of immigrant Ashkenazic life — immigrants for whom the language and the culture around the language was foremost.”

Another musician, stride pianist Willie “The Lion” Smith, also from Newark and born to a white Jewish father and Christian mother of Black, Spanish and Native American heritage, had a similar experience to LaRue, attending synagogue with his white Jewish neighbors. But while he listed “Hebrew cantor” and “Yiddisher khazn” on his business card (and popularized the aforementioned “Eli, Eli” for Black singers), he was better known for tickling the ivories in a Jazz context. According to Sapoznik, LaRue appears to have only ever performed in the Jewish sphere, singing Jewish music.

He started early. One oft-circulated origin story states that LaRue was at a Shabbat service as a child when a cantor suddenly took ill. LaRue was said to have enveloped himself in his tallit and rushed to the bimah to replace him. So wonderful was his voice that the initially-angered congregants began praying along with him.

Image by Courtesy of Henry Sapozni / A cantor named Dovid Ha’Cohen, who went by many other names over his diverse career

LaRue signed on with a concert agent, and toured the vaudeville circuit with Yiddish songs before making his mark in New York’s Yiddish theater in a number of new plays with famed producers Goldberg and Jacobs. He also played vaudeville houses before eventually embarking on a tour of Europe, causing a stir with the Yidden of Poland.

But none of Sapoznik’s research — not the glowing reviews or the potentially apocryphal biography — could prepare him for hearing LaRue’s voice for the first time.

“I didn’t realize that I was holding my breath,” Sapoznik said. “When the music started, it sounded so familiar. The acoustic nature of it. Even the sound of the ensemble was incredibly familiar. But then this voice comes out. I can’t compare it to any other commercial singer – you know, a Molly Picon or Aaron Lebedeff. It was this unique and present voice that now, all of the reviews that I’ve read about these gobsmacked Yiddish newspapermen — all of their high praise was not misplaced. It was reportage!”

Sapoznik said LaRue’s phrasing and tonalities — the hard parts of nailing the sound — were immaculate.

“I think that’s what flipped the Jewish listeners out,” Sapoznik said. “He could say a ‘chet’ with the best of them.”

Image by Photo by William Gottlieb. / Willie “The Lion” Smith, a stride pianist, performer at Harlem’s Clef Club and, also, a cantor.

In one of LaRue’s cantorial offerings, “Misratzeh B’rachamim” a horn-forward opening yields to an expansive tenor, masterfully maneuvering through precipitous key changes and dynamic melisma. It’s good — moving even — but it sounds at home with other recordings of cantors.

On the flip side, though, LaRue sings an original Yiddish song, “Yidele, Farlier Nit Dein Hoffnung.” While the instrumental quality sounds comparable, the singing is something altogether different — rich and remarkably expressive. The voice is at once twangy and powerful and, most remarkably, it cracks periodically. It would be a disservice to the recording, however, to call that crack a fault of the type one hears routinely during a bar mitzvah boy’s haftarah. The crack — which is unmistakable in the final note — is emotive, giving the impression that LaRue unloaded all of his energy and vigor into the take.

“To hear Yosselle Rosenblatt coming out of Thomas La Rue didn’t freak me out,” Sapoznik said, referring to the famed cantor of the same era. “But this Yiddish song on the other side — I don’t hear anyone but him and it is such a unique voice.”

Since receiving the recording, Sapoznik has been revisiting research he hasn’t looked at since “the Carter presidency.” He’s been flooded with messages from Black visitors to his blog, where he is still in the midst unfolding LaRue’s fascinating and ultimately bittersweet saga. Many reaching out are surprised by the level of cultural symbiosis between Black people newly-arrived in Harlem and their white Jewish neighbors in the early part of the 20th century.

At a moment when Sapoznik sees fissures between these communities, he finds the work of exploring their common past particularly meaningful.

“The received history of this time has been so narrow that episodes like this, that talk about a grassroots level of interaction, are priceless,” Sapoznik said.

Yet LaRue was just one piece of a larger musical tradition of his time, when Black men (and some women) moved multitudes with Hebrew prayers and songs in the mamaloshen. There were others.

“I just wish they were recorded,” Sapoznik said.


Zawartość publikowanych artykułów i materiałów nie reprezentuje poglądów ani opinii Reunion’68,
ani też webmastera Blogu Reunion’68, chyba ze jest to wyraźnie zaznaczone.
Twoje uwagi, linki, własne artykuły lub wiadomości prześlij na adres:
webmaster@reunion68.com


Hundred Thousand Dance at Dirshu Siyum |סיומי הש”ס – דרשו – מאה אלף איש מתאחדים בריקודים לכבוד התורה

Hundred Thousand Dance at Dirshu Siyum |סיומי הש”ס – דרשו – מאה אלף איש מתאחדים בריקודים לכבוד התורה


shiezoli


מאה אלף איש מתאחדים בריקודים לכבוד התורה

קליפ יחודי היוצא במיוחד ערב חג השבועות זמן קבלת התורה של מחרוזת ריקודי מזל טוב מיד עם סיום הש”ס במעמדי סיומי הש”ס העולמיים של דרשו שהתקיימו בישראל, לונדון, מנצסטר, פריז, וארה”ב

המחרוזת בוצעה בכל סיומי הש”ס של דרשו שהשתתפו בהם כאמור למעלה ממאה אלף איש, בקליפ משתתפים כל הזמרים שליוו את מעמדי הסיום ברחבי תבל, וניתן לראות את העוצמה וההתרגשות של הציבור בכל אחד ממעמדי הסיום.

קרדיטים:

ביצוע: הזמרים מוטי שטיינמץ, זנוויל וינברגר, אהרלה סמט, אייזיק האניג, אלי הרצליך, שלמה כהן, ישראל אדלר,

תזמורת: המנגנים בניצוחו של מוישי רוט
קולות: מלכות בניצוחו של פנחס ביכלר
מקהלת הילדים: חסידימלך

כשבארה”ב הצטרפו גם מקהלת שירה
מקהלת הילדים אידיש נחת ותזמורת פריילך
והכל בניצוחו של המנצח האגדי ר’ משה מונה רוזנבלום

הפקה טכנית:
ישראל: מיכאל כפלין
אירופה: פליישמן & פלס
ארה”ב: ארי פרנקל
ניהול צלמים: מוטי רבינוביץ
הפקה מוזיקלית: שלום וגשל VMP הפקות.

מיקס: חיים גוטסמן
עריכת וידיאו: הרשיס
מולטימדיה: ויזואל לייב
במאי צילום ארה”ב: יענקי טייטלבוים
יח”צ: ישראל ברגר

 


Zawartość publikowanych artykułów i materiałów nie reprezentuje poglądów ani opinii Reunion’68,
ani też webmastera Blogu Reunion’68, chyba ze jest to wyraźnie zaznaczone.
Twoje uwagi, linki, własne artykuły lub wiadomości prześlij na adres:
webmaster@reunion68.com

 


Kościelny indeks ślubnych pieśni zakazanych: Cohen, Beatlesi, Rubik. W pełni się solidaryzuję

Kościelny indeks ślubnych pieśni zakazanych: Cohen, Beatlesi, Rubik. W pełni się solidaryzuję

Krzysztof Varga


Piotr Rubik (Fot. Piotr Augustyniak / Agencja Gazeta)

Zakładam się o sto lat odpustu, że wielu w osłupienie wprawiło pojawienie się na liście zapisu na “Ave Maria” Jana Sebastiana Bacha

Hierarchowie diecezji płockiej ułożyli krótką, acz treściwą listę piosenek, jakich nie winszują sobie na nabożeństwach ślubnych udzielanych w podległych im kościołach. Informacja ta wywołała pewne poruszenie, a nawet rytualną podnietę, że oto Kościół znów coś cenzuruje, gdyż na liście znalazły się tak niewinne utwory jak „Serce matki” Mieczysława Fogga czy „Niech mówią, że to nie jest miłość” Piotra Rubika. Może zdziwić na tej czarnej liście religijna przecież w wyrazie, znana wszystkim „Hallelujah” Leonarda Cohena, ale mnie nie dziwi, bo Cohen nie dość, że śpiewa, iż „miłość to nie zwycięski marsz”, to na dodatek wyraża pretensje do Boga, że ten nie przepada za muzyką. Trudno wymagać od płockich duchownych, aby wsłuchiwali się w pretensje Cohena do Boga, kościół to nie jest miejsce, żeby w ogóle z Bogiem się wadzić, szczególnie o muzykę.

Szokujące wybory młodych

Choć o tym, czy Bóg przepada za muzyką, czy nie znosi jej szczerze, można toczyć niekończące się dialektyczne i teologiczne spory, ale mija się to z celem. Ja akurat stoję na niewzruszonym stanowisku, że Bóg za muzyką wręcz szaleje. Ale zakładam się o sto lat odpustu, że wielu w osłupienie wprawiło pojawienie się na liście zapisu na „Ave Maria” Jana Sebastiana Bacha, pieśni zdawałoby się wymarzonej na ślubne wzmożenie. Otóż i w tym wypadku płocka kuria ma zupełną rację, jest tam przecież znana każdemu niemowlęciu fraza „Teraz i w godzinę śmierci naszej”, niestosowna, jak mi się zdaje, akurat na ślub. Stoi na liście także „All you need is love” Beatlesów. Wychwalająca to fundamentalne dla wiary chrześcijańskiej uczucie piosenka też jest nie do końca pobożną, z katolickim ślubem nijak się ona nie rymuje. Na marginesie – gdybym usłyszał na własnym ślubie „All you need is love”, natychmiast pierzchnąłbym sprzed ołtarza, bo organicznie nie trawię tej melasy beatlesowskiej. Z poczciwiną Foggiem sprawa jeszcze bardziej jasna – „Serce matki” to song o tym, że świat jest zły, pełen obłudy, fałszu, sztucznych łez (o sztucznych łzach na ślubie słuchać?!) i że „miłości szczerej nie ma”, a jedyne prawdziwe uczucie pochodzi od matki, jeno ona nasz ból zrozumie. Słuchać w rozrzewnieniu na ślubie, że nie istnieje prawdziwa miłość, a jedynie fałszywa, udawana, jakoś niełacno. Szokujące zdaje mi się jedynie to, że młodzi ludzie mogli zamawiać na ślub Mieczysława Fogga. Czyżby napór rodziny, nacisk dziadków państwa młodych?

Test na niedojrzałość

Co do pamiętnego, a może już nawet zapomnianego Piotra Rubika, swego czasu króla kiczu i tandety, to pieśń jego opowiada o tym, że wszyscy wokół dwojga zakochanych uważają ich za ciężkich frajerów, którzy uwierzyli w zwykły fantazmat, bajer i ściemę, bo tak naprawdę ich uczucie to ułuda na granicy niedorozwoju umysłowego. Bohaterowie tego przerażającego produktu (ze słynnym klaskaniem!) powinni mieć absolutny zakaz zawierania małżeństw, bo potem trzeba się natrudzić przy załatwianiu kościelnego unieważnienia małżeństwa, motywując to klauzulą niedojrzałości psychicznej małżonków do życia w tym sakramencie. Zawsze załatwianie rozwodu kościelnego było zejściem do emocjonalnych i biurokratycznych piekieł, choć akurat ostatnio w tej kwestii bardzo się poprawiło, sądy papieskie rozwiązują małżeństwa kościelne na potęgę. Może nie w Płocku, ale w reszcie kraju, szczególnie w Krakowie, księża masowo i od ręki dają drugie śluby kościelne rozwodnikom, rzecz kiedyś nie do pomyślenia.

Doprawdy, trudno mieć pretensje do płockiej diecezji, że zakazała puszczania tych utworów przy udzielaniu sakramentu małżeństwa. Osobiście w pełni solidaryzuję się z diecezją płocką jak z żadną inną ostatnio, w żadnej innej sprawie. To raczej nowożeńcy domagający się na kościelnych uroczystościach tych przebojów o klęskach miłości, względnie o frajerskim zakochaniu, musieli mieć fundamentalny problem ze zrozumieniem tekstów. Najwidoczniej młode pary, zaczadzone egzaltacją, żądały owych piosenek, przekonane, że pasują one nastrojem i wymową do najważniejszej w ich życiu uroczystości, nie zdając sobie sprawy z ich wymowy. Od dawna mówimy o tym, że Polacy nic nie czytają, a jak czytają, to i tak nic nie rozumieją, najwidoczniej nic nie rozumieją także z tekstów, które słyszą w piosenkach. Jak widać, wtórny analfabetyzm postępuje w szaleńczym tempie, głównie wśród nowożeńców. Heroiczna postawa diecezji płockiej zasługuje na najwyższe uznanie, ale niestety ogólnej sytuacji w Polsce nie uratuje.

Ze swej strony postulowałbym w takim razie zamiast zupełnie nie do zniesienia „Marsza weselnego” Mendelssohna na uroczystość zaślubin wybrać raczej „Marsz żałobny” tegoż kompozytora – nastrój wzniosły i adekwatny do ślubu, bo nawet radosny, w porównaniu z „Marszem żałobnym” Chopina wręcz frywolny, a powiedziałbym że muzycznie lepszy od jego (Mendelssohna) upiornego, by nie rzec obrzydliwego weselnego evergreenu.

Skryte marzenia o indeksie dzieł zakazanych

Niektórzy obłudnie się oburzają na te zakazy, ale kto z was, czytelniczki i czytelnicy, nie pragnąłby stworzyć indeksu książek zakazanych, kto z was, słuchaczki i słuchacze, napisać indeksu piosenek zakazanych, wreszcie kto z was, kinomanki i kinomani, nie marzy skrycie o indeksie filmów zakazanych?

Watykański „Index librorum prohibitorum” to prawdziwy kanon arcydzieł, to lista wszechdziejowych bestsellerów, każdy ambitny pisarz czy naukowiec marzyłby o tym, żeby się na nim znaleźć, nie każdy miał to szczęście, ale mnogość wielkich umysłów się załapała, trochę szkoda, że ów „Index” formalnie został zniesiony. Kłopot prawdziwy na tym oczywiście polega, że im się bardziej zakazuje, tym znany ze swej niezłomnej niepokorności lud polski usilniej do zakazanej pieśni lgnie i usta jego wraz z gardzielą do śpiewu się aż rwą.

Ja bardziej niż ksiąg zakazanych boję się książek i piosenek nakazanych. Póki zakazują, czynią rzecz pociągającą, kiedy jednak zaczyna się książki nakazywać, gdy śpiewać te, a nie inne pieśni przykazuje – rzecz robi się poważna. Jak zbadano, lektury obowiązkowe zabijają czytelnictwo, pieśni nakazane – zniechęcają do śpiewu, obrazy nachalnie przed oczy pchane – od wielkiej sztuki malarskiej odepchnąć mogą na zawsze, bo skoro Matejko wielkim malarzem był, to człowiek do końca życia na żadne płótno nie chce spojrzeć. Jak go Kossakami karmi się jak gęś tuczną, to na widok konia, osobliwie z ułanem na wierzchu, torsji dostaje natychmiast i zarówno konie, ułani, jak i całe malarstwo batalistyczne, patriotyczne i hipiczne odrzucać go będzie aż do chwili, gdy nad jego trumną wybrzmią dźwięki „Marsza żałobnego” Chopina.


Zawartość publikowanych artykułów i materiałów nie reprezentuje poglądów ani opinii Reunion’68,
ani też webmastera Blogu Reunion’68, chyba ze jest to wyraźnie zaznaczone.
Twoje uwagi, linki, własne artykuły lub wiadomości prześlij na adres:
webmaster@reunion68.com


German Chancellor Angela Merkel: ‘Many Jews do not feel safe in our country’

German Chancellor Angela Merkel: ‘Many Jews do not feel safe in our country’

kp, ipj/rc (AFP, epd, KNA)


Speaking at the 70th anniversary of the Central Council of Jews in Germany, Chancellor Angela Merkel said that anti-Semitism in Germany “never disappeared.”

Delivering a keynote address in a ceremony commemorating the 70th anniversary of the Central Council of Jews in Germany, Chancellor Angela Merkel on Tuesday said that many German Jews still do not feel safe and that anti-Semitism in Germany “never disappeared.”

“Many Jews do not feel safe, do not feel respected in our country. This is one part of today’s reality and it is one that causes me grave concern,” Merkel said at the ceremony in Berlin. 

The chancellor called it a “shame” that racism and anti-Semitism “never disappeared” in Germany, stressing that more recently such worldviews seem to be “more visible and without restriction.”

Rise in anti-Semitic conspiracy theories

Merkel cited the increased prevalence of conspiracy theories and hate speech targeting Jewish citizens on social media

“That is something we must never accept in silence,” she said to applause. 

Merkel recalled the deadly attack last year on a synagogue in the German city of Halle as an example of “how quickly words can become deeds.”

“Group related hostility against people is something we must fight,” the chancellor said.

She added that the rule of law was an important tool to be used to this end, citing measures the German government took to fight anti-Semitism over the past year, including the establishment of a new cabinet committee focused on this issue. 

“Anti-Semitism is an attack on people, humanity, against being a human being, because its directed against the dignity of individual people,” she said. 

Nazi ideas have ‘not disappeared’

Speaking ahead of Merkel, Council President Josef Schuster also denounced the increasing prominence of anti-Semitic sentiment, including an increase in conspiracy theories and crimes targeting Jews. 

Anti-Jewish conspiracy theories, akin to the Middle Ages, have resurfaced during the current coronavirus pandemic, Schuster said. 

“The Nazis’ ideas have still not disappeared,” he said. 

The Central Council of Jews in Germany was formed in Frankfurt in 1950, initially to represent Jewish survivors of the Holocaust who were considering exile or moving to newly-founded Israel. The council represented some 15,000 Jews located in the post-war American, French, British and Soviet occupation zones as well as exiles contemplating returns to Germany. 

Some 26,000 Jews lived in 50 communities in then-West Germany and 500 Jews in five communities in the eastern GDR under Soviet rule. 

Schuster called the council’s founders as “pioneers.”

“Where did people get the courage and optimism to start all over again?” he said. 

Its founders deserved respect for their role planting the seed for Jewish life in Germany, Schuster said, saying that they were moved to show “great trust” in Germany because they felt tied to the country.

The council now represents Jewish communities across Germany, comprising about 100,000 persons — religious and secular.


Zawartość publikowanych artykułów i materiałów nie reprezentuje poglądów ani opinii Reunion’68,
ani też webmastera Blogu Reunion’68, chyba ze jest to wyraźnie zaznaczone.
Twoje uwagi, linki, własne artykuły lub wiadomości prześlij na adres:
webmaster@reunion68.com


Nearly 20 percent of Millennials, Gen Z in NY believe Jews caused the Holocaust: Survey

Nearly 20 percent of Millennials, Gen Z in NY believe Jews caused the Holocaust: Survey

Elizabeth Rosner


The Museum of Jewish Heritage in 36 Battery Place, New York, / NY.Gregory P. Mango

Nearly 20 percent of Millennials and Gen Z in New York believe the Jews caused the Holocaust, according to a new survey released on Wednesday.

The findings come from the first ever 50-state survey on the Holocaust knowledge of American Millennials and Gen Z, which was conducted by the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany.

For instance, although there were more than 40,000 camps and ghettos during World War II, 58 percent of respondents in New York cannot name a single one.

Additionally, 60 percent of respondents in New York do not know that six million Jews were killed during the Holocaust.

“The results are both shocking and saddening and they underscore why we must act now while Holocaust survivors are still with us to voice their stories,” said Gideon Taylor, President of the Conference on Jewish Material Claim Against Germany.

A total of 34 percent of respondents in New York believe the Holocaust happened but the number of Jews who died has been greatly exaggerated or believe the Holocaust is a myth and did not happen or are unsure.

A shocking 28 percent of respondents in New York believe it is acceptable to hold neo-Nazi views, while 62 percent have never visited a Holocaust museum in the United States.

At least 65 percent of respondents in New York believe Holocaust education should be compulsory in school, and 79 percent say it is important to keep teaching about the Holocaust, in part, so that it does not happen again.

“We need to understand why we aren’t doing better in educating a younger generation about the Holocaust and the lessons of the past. This needs to serve as a wake-up call to us all, and as a road map of where government officials need to act,” Taylor


Zawartość publikowanych artykułów i materiałów nie reprezentuje poglądów ani opinii Reunion’68,
ani też webmastera Blogu Reunion’68, chyba ze jest to wyraźnie zaznaczone.
Twoje uwagi, linki, własne artykuły lub wiadomości prześlij na adres:
webmaster@reunion68.com